EASTER TRADITION Vs GOSPEL TRUTH

I grew up with new clothes, Easter Bunnies, Easter eggs, Easter Baskets, Easter candy, a Sunrise Service, an Easter egg hunt during Sunday School and special sermons about the resurrection of Jesus Christ. By the time we heard about the resurrection of Jesus Christ, Ishtar had been receiving our worship for hours.

Hold on… First we will talk about Easter and Ishtar, but the good stuff about Passover follows quickly.

I grew up with new clothes, Easter Bunnies, Easter eggs, Easter Baskets, Easter candy, a Sunrise Service, an Easter egg hunt during Sunday School and special sermons about the resurrection of Jesus Christ. By the time we heard about the resurrection of Jesus Christ, Ishtar had been receiving our worship for hours.

Hold on… First we will talk about Easter and Ishtar, but the good stuff about Passover follows quickly.

The Feast of Ishtar has followed the spring equinox for thousands of years. Easter is nothing more than an old English spelling of Ishtar. Understand this:

  • New Clothes were a tradition for the Feast of Ishtar. They represented a “New Beginning”.
  • Young girls all dressed in white dresses and bonnets.
  • Ishtar is often pictured with Rabbits and Eggs.
  • Ishtar is a fertility goddess. Her worship brings about the resurrection of the New Year.
  • Ishtar egg hunts were a tradition.
  • Rabbits were used because they have sex a lot and make a lot of babies. Fertility.
  • Eggs were used because they contain hidden life that is resurrected when they hatch.
  • A rabbit that lays eggs is the ultimate fertility symbol.
  • The worship of Ishtar started at sunrise with a sunrise orgy.
  • Sunrise represents a new beginning.
  • An open air orgy, at sunrise, following the spring equinox was the ultimate worship of the goddess of fertility.
  • They believed that open air sex, in large groups, on the first Sunday in spring, would arouse the gods and cause them to inseminate the crops with rain from their emissions.

Now, about the Gospel Story. Jesus was crucified on Passover. Understand this:

  • Jewish Passover is a week and a day. Passover week and Passover day.
  • Jesus entered Jerusalem in his Triumphal Entry, Passover week, five days before Passover day.
  • Jesus entered Jerusalem on the day that the Passover Lamb was chosen.
  • Jesus was Crucified on Passover day. The day the Lamb was slain.
  • Jesus was crucified at nine O’clock in the morning.
  • The Passover Lamb was tied to the altar at nine O’clock in the morning.
  • Jesus died at three O’clock in the afternoon.
  • The Passover Lamb was slain at three O’clock in the afternoon.
  • Jesus was in the tomb for three days following Passover.
  • In Judaism, those days are known as the “Days of Awe”.
  • Jesus rose from the dead on the fourth morning, Sunday.
  • That day is the Feast of First Fruits.

1 Corinthians 15:20 But now Christ has been raised from the dead, the firstfruits of those who have fallen asleep. 21 For since death came through a man, the resurrection of the dead also comes through a man. 22 For as in Adam all die, so also in Christ all will be made alive. 23 But each in his own order: Christ, the firstfruits; afterward, at His coming, those who belong to Christ.

Now you have a choice. Easter or Passover. Which will you celebrate this year and the next?

David…

 

Author: davidrice1951

I am a vile sinner. I have been a soldier and a sailor. I have been a student and a teacher. I taught English in Mexico. I started and taught in a Bible College in Venezuela. I am married to Cathy, a beautiful lady from Guyana. We have two children, Christopher and Amanda. I am saved by Grace, washed in the Blood and filled with the Spirit. I love Jesus, my wife, my kids and you...

4 thoughts on “EASTER TRADITION Vs GOSPEL TRUTH”

  1. From your list above you write, “Jewish Passover is a week and a day. Passover week and Passover day.” Don’t you actually mean, “HEBREW Passover….” as there were no Jews in the Bible when Moses lead the Hebrews out of Egypt which is where the Passover Feast originates.
    Too, you write, “In Judaism, those days are known as the “Days of Awe.” Where “in Judaism” are these “Days of Awe” written?? In the Talmud? The word “awe” occurs 3 times in the Book of Psalms in 3 different Chapters in the King James Bible. And no where in the Bible do the words “awe” and “days” appear together in one sentence.

    And for good measure, I will add that our Freemasonic ” founding fathers” who gave us pagan symbols, were also mostly “crypto” Jews (Jews pretending to be Gentile) and not Gentiles as we were lead to believe. I learned 3 years ago that my family is crypto-Jew Illuminati – which was the “family secret” as me, my mother and grandparents never knew, nor were ever told, we were Jews.

    For good measure I’ll add Revelations’ verses 2:9 and 3:9, so people will know what is in the Bible:
    Rev. 2:9 I know thy works, and tribulation, and poverty, (but thou art rich) and I know the blasphemy of them which say they are Jews, and are not, but are the synagogue of Satan.
    Rev. 3:9 Behold, I will make them of the synagogue of Satan, which say they are Jews, and are not, but do lie; behold, I will make them to come and worship before thy feet, and to know that I have loved thee.

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  2. You note that the Messiah rose on the fourth morning on a Sunday. However, the scriptures clearly say towards the dawning of the first day, which a Jewish day begins not in morning as we traditionally think of morning, but instead begins at sundown of the day before. Twilight being that time of day when it is still daylight as the sun does down. They go to the tomb toward the dawning of the first day, and he is not there! He is already risen before the sunday begins at sundown. Therefore, he rises on the 7th day which He is Lord of the Sabbath and appropriate that he rise on the sabbath day, first fruits being offered at twilight as the first day dawns and a new beginning comes to be

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    1. The first day begins at sundown but the dawn is still in the morning. It was not on the evening (which came first) but at the dawning. The Greek is very clear that it was at sunrise on the first day… roughly 12 hours into Sunday…

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